Tour of The Galaxy Garden

HIGH RES IMAGES AVAILABLE TO PRINT MEDIA UPON REQUEST TO lomberg@aloha.net


Galaxy Garden Tour.
A view from above of the entire Milky Way Galaxy, looking west.

Galaxy Garden Tour.
A map of the spiral arms, looking south.

Galaxy Garden Tour.
Flowers at the correct distance and direction indicate famous nebulae such as the Orion, North America, Eta Carina, Lagoon, Trifid, Crab, etc.

Galaxy Garden Tour.
Another view of the local neighborhood.

Here are some of the flowers representing nebulae mapped in the Galaxy Garden:

Hibiscus flower representing the Trifid Nebula.
Trifid Nebula.

Hibiscus flower representing the Eta Carinae Nebula.
Eta Carinae Nebula.

Hibiscus flower representing the Lagoon Nebula.
Lagoon Nebula.

Galaxy Garden Tour.
Our Sun and most of the stars visible to the naked eye are very close in galactic terms. If our Sun is one dot on a leaf, most other familiar stars are on the same or nearby leaves. Sirius is 8 light year away - about 0.1", Vega is 27 l.y. (0.33"). In the direction opposite the Galactic Center the Pleiades star cluster is 440 l.y. (5.5"), Betelgeuse is 640 l.y. (8") and Rigel almost 800 l.y. (9").

Numbered Disks.
Numbered disks are used to mark various features of the galaxy. Black disks identify the spiral arms and bar, and yellow/green disks identify specific features. The disks in this photo indicate the Orion arm (black 6) and the Orion Nebula (yellow 2). All visitors to the Galaxy Garden receive a booklet with a key to the disks. Verbiage is thus minimized in the garden, but easily available to those who wish it.

Galaxy Garden Tour.
Bright emission nebula and star-forming regions are represented by hibiscus flowers. This is in the correct position to be the Lagoon nebula in the Sagittarius Arm.

Galaxy Garden Tour.
The highlighted plants represent globular star clusters which are often elevated high above the disk of the galaxy.

Galaxy Garden Tour.
A jet from the black hole at the galactic center is framed by globular clusters. M3 is in the foreground, and on the other side of the galactic center you can see two very close line-of-sight globulars NGC 6293 and NGC 6287, which are actually about 1000 light years apart. Also, just peeking up above the rim of the fountain is globular M9. And poking in on the right hand edge of frame is globular IC 1276. All of these clusters are aligned with the bar, as are a great many others, likely a more than statistically random number. Click here to check out the longitudes of all 158 known globulars. This is just the kind of thing that is difficult to visualize until you see it in 3-D!

The Far Side of the Galaxy.
The Far Side of the Galaxy.

Black Hole Fountain.
A jet from the center of the galaxy indicates recent activity around the black hole at the Galaxy's very center.

Black Hole Fountain.
Water in the pond flows towards the center, falling into the event horizon that circles the black hole, represented conventionally in the form of a gravity well.

Galaxy Garden Tour.
A labeled diagram of the black hole.

Butterfly visiting the Galaxy Garden.
The galaxy receives a visitor among the glittering stars.

Jon Lomberg at the Black Hole Fountain. Photograph by Daniel Deslauriers

Jon Lomberg at the black hole fountain located at the center of the Galaxy Garden.

RETURN to Top